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This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« : Martie 26, 2014, 11:10:10 a.m. »
This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built

http://jalopnik.com/this-is-the-zero-carbon-house-that-honda-built-1551588413

The Honda Smart Home US was apparently to show people what "sustainable, zero-carbon living and personal mobility" looks like to Honda. Or maybe they just saw the houses Toyota builds and thought they could do better.

Anyway, Honda unveiled their home today at the University of California, Davis, complete with a Honda Fit EV parked in the garage. Built in just under a year, someone from UC Davis will actually be selected to live in this home and experience the zero-carbon lifestyle.

Fitted with Honda's "home energy management system" (I had no idea they made one), it uses the 10kWh lithium-ion battery system storing solar energy to minimize the home's impact on the electrical grid as much as possible, even supplying energy back to the grid at times.

To charge the Fit EV inside, Honda has made a DC-to-DC charging system. Why have they done that? Honda:

The Honda Fit EV included with the home has been modified to accept DC power directly from the home's solar panels or stationary battery, eliminating up to half of the energy that is typically lost to heat during DC-to-AC and AC-to-DC power conversion. When the solar panels are generating electricity at full capacity, the vehicle can fully recharge in approximately two hours directly from sunlight.

Like a car, it's filled with a ton of LEDs and has a metal roof, which is apparently more sustainable.

Here's a Honda video explaining more about the Honda house.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7QeI2TGmcG4    :-*


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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #1 : Martie 27, 2014, 09:51:48 a.m. »
http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/In-Gear/2014/0326/Honda-unveils-model-house-built-to-support-electric-car

Honda unveils model house built to support electric car

Honda is showcasing its energy efficiency technology in a model house built around the electric car at the University of California at Davis. The structure includes provisions for the company's Fit EV sedan, LED lighting, plus uses solar and geothermal energy sources, according to the automaker.

Honda built what the company called its "Smart Home" to showcase the company's energy efficiency technology on the campus of the University of California at Davis.

Most of us think "Honda" and bring up economy cars, perhaps lawnmowers, or even portable generators. Complete houses aren't usually on the list.

Yesterday, though, the Japanese carmaker opened its Honda Smart Home US in Davis, California--demonstrating its ideas for how Americans might live a zero-carbon life in the 21st Century.

California often pushes the envelope in new technology, and with its corporate home in the Orange County city of Torrance, Honda opted to site its low-impact living testbed on the campus of the University of California at Davis.

Davis is flat, sunny, and laced with bike paths, and it's just outside the state capital of Sacramento, about 80 miles east of San Francisco.

RECOMMENDED: Top 10 states for clean tech

UC-Davis has long had an emerging West Campus residential community, including space and support staff for these kinds of experiments in living.

Low-impact homes are a topic of discussion around the world, with considerable interest in places like Australia and California, where sun power is plentiful but water can be scarce.

The Honda Smart Home represents about 2,000 square feet, all of it optimized toward energy-efficient living. It's fitted with LED lighting, radiant heating and cooling, a massive geothermal recovery system, a large solar photovoltaic panel system, and even a grey-water filtering and recovery system.

The home is actually designed to be energy positive, contributing electricity to the grid and even including a battery storage system both to capture excess energy and to provide a backup in case of blackouts or peak power demands.

After a period as an open house, the home will be used for three years by UC-Davis visiting faculty and staff, with each tenant staying for a year.

Because this home is an ongoing experiment, tenants will have their power usage monitored--and also be expected to give feedback on the operation and livability of the home as part of regular interviews.

Since this is a Honda Home, the use of a zero-emission Honda Fit EV electric car is included with the home for the next three years.

The garage may be the most interesting and exciting area of what is actually a fairly small and modest home. It contains both a standard 240-Volt Level 2 charging station and, more unusually, an actual DC charging outlet as well.

The solar photovoltaic system charges a 10-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery system, housed in a garage storage area, and the solar panels can also directly charge the Fit EV via that DC cable.

For reference, that battery storage is about 40 percent the size of the Fit EV's own battery pack--but home storage is one of the uses envisioned down the road for used battery packs from electric cars, after the batteries' useful life in cars has ended.

Yesterday's event appeared to be a big deal for executives from Honda, judging by the cars parked outside: not only the low-volume Honda Fit EV, but also a 2014 Honda Accord Plug-In Hybrid, and even a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle.

The Honda Smart Home does not, however, have its own hydrogen filling station. For that, unlike the Fit EV electric car, residents would have to go elsewhere.


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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #2 : Martie 27, 2014, 03:28:15 p.m. »
http://www.davisenterprise.com/local-news/ucd/house-of-the-near-future-honda-ucd-unveil-live-in-green-building-laboratory/

House of the (near) future from Honda, UCD



Ralph J. Hexter, UC Davis Provost and executive vice chancellor, speaks to UCD and industry experts, government representatives and media gathered Tuesdays for a walk through of the Honda Smart Home US, next to UCD’s West Village apartments. The home is designed to “enable zero net energy living and transportation.”

Honda and UC Davis are betting a demonstration house with a small carbon footprint will make a big impression.

On Tuesday, the partners held a ceremonial opening for the aptly green-painted, 1,944-square-foot Honda Smart Home U.S.

Located just off the square in West Village — itself billed as a living laboratory for net-zero living — the house boasts a 9.5-kilowatt solar array, an experimental, Honda-designed Home Energy Management System and advanced lighting, heating and cooling systems.

Together, they should enable the occupant to use half as much as the owner of a new, similarly sized Davis-area home while producing enough electricity annually to power the house and a Honda Fit EV in its garage.

Researchers from UCD, Honda and Pacific Gas and Electric Co. will evaluate new technology in the house, which arrives as California and other states seek to reach zero net energy consumption goals for new buildings by 2020.

“If you want to address climate change, you need to think beyond cars to another major source of carbon: our home,” said Steve Case, vice president of the environmental business development office of American Honda Motor Co. Inc.

“Together, our homes and cars are responsible for 44 percent of CO2 emissions in the U.S. We need to, and we can, address both at once. That’s precisely what the Honda Smart Home demonstrates: a zero-carbon solution of living and mobility.”

The house and the Fit EV should achieve more than an 11-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions than a comparable house and car.

Put another way, a regular home consumes about 13.3 megawatt hours or electricity annually — while the Smart Home will pump about 2.6 megawatt hours’ worth back into the grid. That 15.9 megawatt hours difference could power a Fit EV for about 55,000 miles, Honda says.

“The house is the house of the near future — almost all of this is off-the-shelf right now,” said Michael Koenig, Honda Smart Home project leader.

One major exception: the company’s Home Energy Management System.

It monitors energy input and sends that energy where it’s needed — to the house, the car or to the grid. It’s paired with a 10 kilowatt-hour lithium battery, located in the garage, that stores energy from the solar array to be used at night.

The Fit EV as designed can take DC power directly from the solar panels or from the from the stationary battery. The car’s battery takes about two hours to charge during periods of bright sunlight.

The stationary battery begins to address two concerns for utility companies as more people use solar power and electric cars: the intermittent nature of energy production and the load needed to charge vehicles.

The battery provides a constant power output to the grid, Koenig said, so that it doesn’t need to react to the house’s loads fluctuating wildly. PG&E can also signal the house’s system to send more power into the grid at periods of peak demand.

Center said Honda is still feeling its way forward on energy management and storage systems. It’s also experimenting with home technology in Japan.

“Whether or not we ultimately decide to commercialize these technologies, it’s still critical that we understand them and the economics behind them,” Case said.

If the Home Management System is the brain of the Smart Home, then its beating heart — a single multi-function electric heat pump — sits inside its central mechanical room.

Selected and watched over by researchers from UCD’s Western Cooling Efficiency Center, the geothermal pump provides the radiant heat and cooling through the slab and ceiling, while also warming water for showers and the like. It’s connected to heat exchangers in the backyard that take advantage of the ground’s relative stable temperatures.

The system is also capable of capturing waste heat from inside of the house on hot days, rather than blowing it into the outside air like a conventional air conditioner. Heat from water pouring down the shower drain can also be recovered: it flows through an exchanger, warming up incoming water.

Graywater is also used to water drought-tolerant native plants in landscape designed by Cunningham Engineering of Davis. Honda estimates the house, with its low-flow fixtures and dual-flush toilets, will use about one-third as much water as a typical U.S. home.

A modern take on the whole-house fan by Davis Energy Group takes advantage of the Delta breeze. Using a tablet computer, the occupant can preset the temperature to which the mass of the home will cool overnight.

The same tablet may be used to monitor and control all of the house’s systems, from energy systems, down to window blinds, audio-visual equipment and the house’s UCD-designed lighting fixtures. All can be controlled remotely.

Researchers from the California Lighting Technology Center at UCD have designed the LED lighting system to be more than energy-efficient — it’s also meant to work with the body’s sleep cycle. Unlike some LEDs, compact flourescent bulbs or computer screens, the fixtures don’t use the blue light that suppresses melatonin and keeps users awake.

Emphasis also has been placed on increasing safety. Automatic amber lights create a nighttime path from the bedrooms to the bathroom and kitchen.

Other keys to the building’s efficiency are its passive solar design, which takes advantage of natural light, double-stud walls and triple-pain windows. Its roof is a reflective, durable metal, eliminating the need for shingles, which Koenig said are problematic to recycle, and also allows for the possibility of collecting rainwater in the future.

Honda has also emphasized the use of other green-building materials. “Every stick” of wood in the house, down to the custom furniture, is Forest Stewardship Council-certified, Koenig said.

MAK Design + Build of Davis lent its expertise to the house’s green-friendly finishes, doors and furnishings — including patio furniture made from recycled milk jugs.

Every pound of ordinary cement  puts out about a pound of carbon dioxide, so Honda attempted to offset that by working with a local factory to produce mix that’s 50-percent ash.

Honda has made a three-year commitment to the house project. It plans to make public the results of the efficiency studies, along with the house’s design specifications.

UCD Provost Ralph Hexter called the project “a shining example” of a public-private research partnership.

The company will not say how much it has spent on the project. It provides about $100,000 in funding annually to the campus’ Energy Efficiency Center as well as research support. An advisor to Honda’s environmental business development office, Aki Yasuoka, sits on the center’s board of advisors.

“For Honda, our own contribution will be when we develop these types of energy management systems, but, holistically, the greatest value of the project is if we can start the conversations (about sustainably),” Koenig said.

“Because one house by itself doesn’t move the needle, but if I can get five or 10 or a 1,000 people to talk about it and even if they’re just replacing the furniture in their house and they say, ‘Oh, I’ve never heard of FSC, I’ve never heard of organic materials or natural latex’ — if I can start those conversations, that’s the way to affect change.”

A UCD faculty or staff member will be selected to live in the house. Koenig has lived there over the past few weeks, while its systems were adjusted.

“If you forget the fact that it’s a laboratory, it’s actually a delightful place to stay,” he said.

After an open house this weekend, Honda says the smart home will be open infrequently, mostly for VIP tours. A small visitor’s center next to the house will be open daily.

— Online: http://www.hondasmarthome.com.




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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #3 : Aprilie 02, 2014, 09:16:21 p.m. »
http://www.gizmag.com/honda-smart-home-energy-producing/31380/

Energy-producing Honda Smart Home gives more than it takes

With homes and light-vehicles accounting for roughly 44 percent of total greenhouse gases emitted in the US, neutralizing these emissions would certainly go a long way towards a clean energy future. What if these sources of pollution could not only be nullified, but play an active role in reducing our environmental footprint? Such is the thinking behind the Honda Smart Home US unveiled last week, which generates enough solar energy to power both car and home, with a little left over to feed back into the grid.

Constructed on campus at the University of California (UC), Davis, the Honda Smart Home US follows in the footsteps of the Honda Smart Home System, which the company demonstrated in Japan in 2012. But in addition to outlining an off-grid living solution, its latest effort hones in on the potential of smart connectivity between the home and main grid to impact overall energy reliability.

The Honda Smart Home US is driven by the company's home energy management system (HEMS). This proprietary system, the brains of the operation, is housed in the garage to monitor and optimize electrical consumption across the home's micro-grid.

Sitting alongside the HEMS is a 10 kWh battery that uses the same lithium-ion cells you'll find in Honda's Fit EV. This battery stores the energy collected by the 9.5 kW solar photovoltaic system mounted on the roof for night time usage (when demand peaks and vehicles are likely in need of recharging).

Laying a foundation

A typical concrete slab for a house requires a large amount of cement to hold it together. Producing this cement, which involves heating it to more than 1,000° C (1,832°F), requires significant amounts of energy, while the chemical reaction itself produces carbon dioxide.

The team replaced around half of the cement with pozzolan, a substance that occurs naturally in the earth as a result of volcanic ash deposits. As pozzolan doesn't need to be heated to the same high temperatures as cement, integrating it into the concrete mix meant Honda was able to reduce the carbon emissions typically associated with the construction of a home.
Heating and cooling

A geothermal heat pump provides the house with heating, cooling and hot water all from the one machine. Water is heated in a tank and delivered to the shower. As the shower drains, the grey water is used to help preheat the cold city water, helping to reduce the energy required to provide hot water to the home.

Once it has fulfilled its hot water duties, the shower drainage is pumped into four thermal tanks underneath the backyard. Here, heat from the earth warms the liquid further, turning it into what the team calls Ground Source Fluid. This fluid is then returned to the house and driven through pipes located in the floor, roof and ceiling to provide heating. Alternatively, cold water can be pumped through the system to cool the house in the summer months.

In designing the home, the team took into account local weather conditions with north-facing windows positioned to maximize natural light and ventilation, while south-facing windows are designed to optimize heating and cooling. Double-stud walls, a cool metal roofing material and an insulated concrete base are other elements that Honda says contribute to the overall energy efficiency of the dwelling.

For coming and going

The home is equipped with a Honda Fit EV, the solar panels providing enough juice for a typical daily commute. Honda modified the electric vehicle to accept DC power directly from the home's solar panels or its 10 kW battery, which it says prevents a loss of energy that occurs during a DC to AC conversion. Honda claims the vehicle can be recharged in around two hours when the solar panels are working at full capacity.
Shedding some light (and energy)

LED lighting is used throughout the home to reduce energy consumption and also as a means of contributing to the well-being of the residents. Honda worked in collaboration with the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis to explore a new form of circadian color control lighting.

Its lighting solution mimics shifts in natural lighting throughout the day and night. Using bright blue-rich light in the daytime, the lights are designed to optimize alertness and energy, while using an amber tone creates a more relaxed atmosphere after the sun goes down.
In numbers

All of these factors result in a home that Honda says is three times more water-efficient and uses half the energy of similar-sized homes in the Davis area. It estimates that, while a comparable home in the area consumes 13.3 mWh of electricity per year, the smart home will generate a surplus of 2.6 mWh. Honda says this equates to an offset in carbon emissions of nearly 13,100 lb (5,942 kg) per year. If you factor in the energy typically involved in powering a vehicle in addition to the home, this figure is around 23,500 lb (10,659 kg).
So when can I move in?

Honda and researchers from UC Davis and Pacific Gas and Electric are currently using the home as a laboratory to carry out ongoing evaluations of new technologies and real-world applications in the housing, transportation and energy sectors.

This will allow Honda to assess how viable the use of EV batteries could be in home-to-grid connectivity and other applications. It says the smart HEMS model, which feeds power back to the main grid when the home's micro-grid is overloaded, has the potential to enable large-scale implementation of electric vehicles and renewable energy systems through improving overall grid reliability.

You can hear from some of the people behind the design and construction of the Honda Smart Home US in the video below.

Source; Honda

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QeI2TGmcG4




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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #4 : Mai 01, 2014, 10:12:12 p.m. »
http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/hondas-smart-home-isnt-such-dumb-idea.html

Honda's Smart Home isn't such a dumb idea

Honda and UC Davis mash together our two biggest carbon emitters, the house and the car.

All the big boys are into smart homes these days; GE, Bosch, and Google all make the thermostats, heat pumps, sensors and equipment needed to run these marvels. Honda makes cars, not gadgets, so they could pick and choose their technologies, and have built a home on the campus of UC Davis that deals with our biggest problem: CO2 from our buildings and cars. I have expressed a preference for dumb homes, worrying about cost and complexity, but this one hits a smart balance.

Passive Solar Design:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oR15cPB0Lss

For one thing, they paid attention to the basics. The best way to reduce your cooling costs is to keep the heat out in the first place, so they carefully studied the sun angles and shading, using passive solar design. The house is built from FSC certified lumber, metal roofs, to a very high standard, according to Green Building Advisor:



Double stud wall construction. Above-grade exterior walls are made from two 2x4 stud walls on 24-in. centers designed to eliminate thermal bridging except at the fire blocking. The 9 1/2-in. wall cavities are insulated with cellulose (R-31).
Triple-glazed windows. The argon-filled casements are manufactured by Alpen.
A truss roof with a vented roof deck. The roof is insulated to R-60 with cellulose.
Insulated slab. Rigid foam under the concrete slab has an R-value of 10.
Airtightness. The house tested at 2.0 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals.

They used clever materials like pozzolan infused concrete, along with post-tensioning, to reduce the carbon footprint of their concrete slab.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Zqkc54fHZc

Concrete accounts for approximately 5% of global, man-made CO2 emissions. This large CO2 footprint is a result of producing cement – the concrete’s “glue” – by heating limestone to more than one thousand degrees Celsius. This heating requires the burning of fossil fuels, while the chemical reaction itself also releases CO2. A naturally-occurring substance called pozzolan was infused into the Honda Smart Home’s concrete to replace half of the cement typically needed. A technique called post-tensioning, which uses steel cables to compress the concrete slab, was also used to reduce the amount of concrete and steel needed.

Indeed, the post-tensioning reduced the thickness of the slab from the normal 10" down to 3-1/2" and uses a lot less reinforcing stee.

Complex ground source heat pumps cool and heat the house and its water:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ6zNDDn5Pc

The house has an extremely complicated heat recovery system where gray water goes into tanks in the garden and then then is recovered to be put through heat pumps to heat and cool the house through radiant floors and ceilings. It seems total overkill for the mild Sacramento climate and the well insulated and carefully designed and shaded house; radiant floors are not particularly useful in these circumstances. They are very expensive and respond slowly. As Alex Wilson has noted, a radiant floors are “a great heating system for lousy houses.” That is not what we have in this house.

However there is a lot of other things going on here, with the integration of domestic hot water and the use of radiant cooling. Running everything out of one heat pump theoretically reduces the hardware costs, and predictive software deals with the thermal lag issue by adjusting the temperature in advance. The tanks only go down 20' so there was a lot less drilling than conventional piping for ground source heat pumps.

UC Davis " will evaluate the performance of the system to determine its adaptability to mainstream use." Read Martin Holladay at Green Building Advisor and I think you will come to your own conclusion about whether they make sense. And please, especially in California where there is real geothermal, stop calling it that, it is a ground source heat pump.

Lighting:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBFogZRsazM

© Honda
Honda and UC Davis mash together our two biggest carbon emitters, the house and the car.

All the big boys are into smart homes these days; GE, Bosch, and Google all make the thermostats, heat pumps, sensors and equipment needed to run these marvels. Honda makes cars, not gadgets, so they could pick and choose their technologies, and have built a home on the campus of UC Davis that deals with our biggest problem: CO2 from our buildings and cars. I have expressed a preference for dumb homes, worrying about cost and complexity, but this one hits a smart balance.

Passive Solar Design

For one thing, they paid attention to the basics. The best way to reduce your cooling costs is to keep the heat out in the first place, so they carefully studied the sun angles and shading, using passive solar design. The house is built from FSC certified lumber, metal roofs, to a very high standard, according to Green Building Advisor:

© Honda

Double stud wall construction. Above-grade exterior walls are made from two 2x4 stud walls on 24-in. centers designed to eliminate thermal bridging except at the fire blocking. The 9 1/2-in. wall cavities are insulated with cellulose (R-31).
Triple-glazed windows. The argon-filled casements are manufactured by Alpen.
A truss roof with a vented roof deck. The roof is insulated to R-60 with cellulose.
Insulated slab. Rigid foam under the concrete slab has an R-value of 10.
Airtightness. The house tested at 2.0 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals.

They used clever materials like pozzolan infused concrete, along with post-tensioning, to reduce the carbon footprint of their concrete slab.

    Concrete accounts for approximately 5% of global, man-made CO2 emissions. This large CO2 footprint is a result of producing cement – the concrete’s “glue” – by heating limestone to more than one thousand degrees Celsius. This heating requires the burning of fossil fuels, while the chemical reaction itself also releases CO2. A naturally-occurring substance called pozzolan was infused into the Honda Smart Home’s concrete to replace half of the cement typically needed. A technique called post-tensioning, which uses steel cables to compress the concrete slab, was also used to reduce the amount of concrete and steel needed.

Indeed, the post-tensioning reduced the thickness of the slab from the normal 10" down to 3-1/2" and uses a lot less reinforcing stee.

Complex ground source heat pumps cool and heat the house and its water

The house has an extremely complicated heat recovery system where gray water goes into tanks in the garden and then then is recovered to be put through heat pumps to heat and cool the house through radiant floors and ceilings. It seems total overkill for the mild Sacramento climate and the well insulated and carefully designed and shaded house; radiant floors are not particularly useful in these circumstances. They are very expensive and respond slowly. As Alex Wilson has noted, a radiant floors are “a great heating system for lousy houses.” That is not what we have in this house.

However there is a lot of other things going on here, with the integration of domestic hot water and the use of radiant cooling. Running everything out of one heat pump theoretically reduces the hardware costs, and predictive software deals with the thermal lag issue by adjusting the temperature in advance. The tanks only go down 20' so there was a lot less drilling than conventional piping for ground source heat pumps.

UC Davis " will evaluate the performance of the system to determine its adaptability to mainstream use." Read Martin Holladay at Green Building Advisor and I think you will come to your own conclusion about whether they make sense. And please, especially in California where there is real geothermal, stop calling it that, it is a ground source heat pump.

Lighting

I want the lighting. At Fast Company, Ben Schiller sort of sneers at it, but this one of the great benefits of LED lighting, its ability to change color temperature.

    Honda worked with researchers from the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis to explore new circadian color control logic. Mimicking the natural shifts in daylight that occur from morning to night, the circadian-friendly lighting design allows occupants to select lighting scenes that complement occupants’ circadian rhythms and support nighttime vision. The amber hallway night lights, for example, provide enough light to navigate through the home in darkness without depleting a photopigment in the human eye called rhodopsin that helps humans see in low-light conditions. This allows occupants to move about safely and return to sleep quickly and easily.

Home Energy Management:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XYR68EJ9zg

The real story of this house is the energy management system. 9.5 kW of photovoltaics on the roof are connected to a 10kWh battery array in the garage, which "leverages the battery to balance, shift and buffer loads to minimize the home’s impact to the electric grid."

    Honda’s HEMS is also capable of improving grid reliability by automatically responding to demand response signals and providing other grid services. If the electricity grid is overloaded, for example, Honda Smart Home is capable of shedding its load and even supplying power back to the grid. This type of smart grid connectivity will enable the mass deployment of electric vehicles and renewable energy without sacrificing grid reliability.

It also lets Honda look at the re-use of older batteries, giving them a second life in the home after they can no longer take a full fast charge needed for a car.



Impressive numbers

The most important feature of this house is how the car and the house work together; what a difference it makes. The house on its own saves the equivalent of 13,100 pounds of CO2 per year, but roll in the electric car and " CO2 savings rise to more than 23,500 pounds per year versus a comparable home and vehicle"

This is where the idea of the smart house makes sense for the average homeowner and builder. Who cares if your fridge is talking to your washing machine; what matters is that your house is talking to your car and working together with it to make them both net zero energy and net zero carbon, dealing with our two biggest sources of CO2, the house and the car.

With the exception of the crazy heat pump and radiant floor system, the Honda Smart Home doesn't rely on gizmo green but has good design, lots of insulation and great windows. it is doing the important stuff and it is doing it well. More power to them.

More photos:

© Honda

It is a nicely designed 2,000 square foot house; here's the project team:

Architect:
Lim Chang Rohling & Associates, Pasadena,

Builder:
Monley Cronin, Woodland,

Interior Design:
MAK Design+Build, Davis,

Energy Consultant:
Davis Energy Group, Davis,

Kitchen appears to have a Bosch induction range with a pop-up exhaust hood. Surprisingly, there is no Heat or energy recovery ventilator; instead there is a sophisticated bathroom exhaust system and a mechanical damper on an air inlet.



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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #5 : Iulie 26, 2014, 09:40:25 a.m. »
http://www.jetsongreen.com/2014/07/honda-smart-house-us-ready-for-testing.html

Honda Smart House US Ready For Testing


The Honda Smart House US has recently been constructed on campus at the University of California (UC), Davis. The house will serve as a test for an off-the-grid living space of the future. Homes and cars are responsible for about 44% of all the greenhouse gases emitted in the US, and in constructing the house, the designers of The Honda Smart House aimed to try and find a way to neutralize these emissions. The house also generates enough solar energy to power both car and home, with a little left over to feed back into the grid.

The Honda Smart Home US is run by the company’s home energy management system (HEMS). This system is located in the garage and works to monitor and optimize electrical consumption across the home’s micro-grid. Next to the HEMS, the builders installed a 10 kWh battery, which is used for storing energy collected by the 9.5 kW solar photovoltaic system mounted on the roof.

The house was built on a concrete slab, around half of which is actually pozzolan, which occurs naturally in the earth as a result of volcanic ash deposits. Due to the fact that pozzolan doesn’t need to be heated to the same high temperatures as cement when laying the foundation, Honda successfully reduced the carbon emissions from the construction of the house.

The heating and cooling of the house is taken care of via a geothermal heat pump, which also supplies the hot water for the household. Water is heated in a tank from where it is used to take a shower. Then the grey water drained from the shower is used to help preheat the cold city water, which further reduces the power needed to supply the hot water for the household.

After it heats the cold water, the drain water from the shower is pumped into four thermal tanks underneath the backyard. The earth’s heat warms the liquid here, and turns it into what the designers call the Ground Source Fluid. This heated fluid is pumped back to the house to heat it by passing through pipes located in the floor, roof and ceiling. In the summer, cold water can be pumped through the house in the same way to provide cooling.

The house was built with the local climate in mind. The north-facing windows maximize natural light and ventilation, while south-facing windows are designed to optimize heating and cooling. The home also has double-stud walls, a metal roof and an insulated concrete base, which all raise the energy efficiency of the house.

Honda also modified their electric car so that it can be charged directly from the home’s solar panels or the battery, which reduces the loss of energy that happens during a DC to AC conversion. To further reduce energy demands, LED lighting was installed throughout the house, while the lighting is also designed to mimic shifts in natural lighting during the day and night. They worked closely with the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis to explore a new form of circadian color control lighting. The house is lit with blue-rich light in the daytime, which are designed to optimize alertness and energy. In the evenings and at night, the lighting is amber toned, which creates a more relaxed atmosphere.

According to the designers, the Honda Smart House US is three times more water-efficient and uses half the energy of similar-sized homes in the area. They further estimate that the house will generate a surplus of 2.6 MWh, which equates to an offset in carbon emissions of nearly 13,100 lb (5,942 kg) per year.

Unfortunately, this house is not yet on the market. Honda and researchers from UC Davis and Pacific Gas and Electric will be using it as a laboratory to carry out ongoing evaluations of new technologies and real-world applications in the housing, transportation and energy sectors.


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Re: This Is The Zero Carbon House That Honda Built
« Răspuns #6 : August 06, 2014, 10:19:34 a.m. »
http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2014/08/honda-smart-home-previews-grid-friendly-living-and-driving.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+cars%2Fkickingtires+%28Kicking+Tires%29

Honda Smart Home Previews Grid-Friendly Living and Driving

We all know Honda is adept at making some excellent automobiles. Many people know it does motorcycles, lawn mowers, power generators and even airplanes. But how about houses? If Honda built family homes as well as family cars, would you be interested? What if that house was super energy efficient and could talk to your plug-in electric vehicle to charge it or use the charge stored in it for keeping the lights on?

Related: Volt Versus All: How Does Chevy's Plug-in Hold Up Against the Plug-In Competition?

Honda is not getting into the home-building business anytime soon, but that hasn't stopped the company from building homes just as described above in Davis, Calif. The modern-looking dwellings are part of a research project with the University of California at Davis to come up with new, practical technologies aimed at improving energy efficiency.

The Honda Smart Home was unveiled back in March; it incorporates many of these new systems to create a carbon-neutral demonstrator home. The one system we're most interested in is a Honda-designed experimental integrated battery-storage and power-management apparatus that's designed to work with a family's electric car; it's called the Home Energy Management System. Check out a video on the whole system from Designing Spaces below.

Using solar panels on the home's roof, the house can generate about 9 kilowatts of electricity on a good day. The HEMSx then monitors several factors like the local utility's energy grid status, the charge level of any plugged-in EVs, the owner's desired departure time and several others to determine what to do with the energy. A 10-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery station is located in the home; using the same battery cells that Honda uses in the Fit EV the station stores energy created by the solar panels if there is no immediate demand for electricity in the home.

The HEMSx can charge the EV with the energy, store it in the home-side batteries or even sell it back to the utility's electrical grid if public demand is causing a spike in prices and a trough in availability. The HEMSx can also use the stored energy to power the house independently of the electrical grid at peak demand times, or in the evening when public demand soars but the electric vehicle in the garage still needs to be charged. It could use the stored energy to charge the EV, if need be. This enables the utility to eventually smooth out generating demand at peak times by using energy stored in homes and cars. Honda has just released a new video describing the thinking behind it below.

A Zero Carbon Lifestyle Home and Transportation Part 1  : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiLWyTdRdeY

Honda also recently announced that it is joining eight other automakers and 15 power utilities in the Electric Power Research Institute, a group dedicated to the study and implementation of more efficient energy strategies and technologies for the U.S. market. Honda in particular is using the initiative to showcase its research into "Vehicle to Grid" technologies, which will enable future EVs to communicate with local utilities and consumers' homes to better manage charging and energy usage.

If EVs do take off in popularity in the near future, the sudden demand spike on utilities would be considerable and troublesome. Efforts like Honda's are designed to try and minimize that impact so as not to stress the existing infrastructure.

You can read all about Honda's efforts and work in designing and testing EV-integrated home systems here. It just might be coming to a garage near you soon.

Addressing Solar Intermittency with a Home Energy Management System (HEMS)  : http://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UU22zQ9nBEk6KOjUWqR5XXZg&v=bNsN6sZUlr8