Autor Subiect: Stiri HONDA MOTO !  (Citit de 16779 ori)

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Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #15 : Mai 01, 2014, 11:30:41 a.m. »
http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/honda-motorcycle-insurance/find-lower-cost-insurance/sbwire-499482.htm

Honda Motorcycle Insurance Discounts Now Available Online

Customers can now find insurance discounts for their Honda motorcycles at the Discount Motorcycle Insurance website.



Orlando, FL -- (SBWIRE) -- 04/29/2014 -- Discount Motorcycle Insurance, a website dedicated to helping people find affordable rates, now enables customers to find Honda motorcycle insurance discounts online. Honda has been on top of the list of stolen motorcycles in some years. At times, one in every four bikes stolen has been a Honda.

Insurance is beneficial in many ways, including getting reimbursement should a bike be stolen. Riders often struggle with finding an affordable policy. They can now access discounts from leading insurers which can help them get the coverage they need while saving money.

Discount Motorcycle Insurance works with many of the top motorcycle insurers in the United States. This enables customers to find the lower rates offered by leading companies in their state or city. The online tools make it fast and easy to look up as many insurance providers as necessary. In addition, there are hundreds of articles to assist riders in obtaining cheaper motorcycle insurance rates.

While the site provides the opportunity to find lower cost insurance, the company recommends several other ways to cut down on motorcycle insurance costs. Some things that help include taking a motorcycle safety course, in which an insurer may reduce the rate. Riders can also purchase a smaller bike that doesn’t cost as much to insure.

Customers can also assess their coverage and decide whether they need everything included. By decreasing the coverage, it is possible to pay less. Lower premiums are also attainable by increasing the deductible, meaning more would be paid out of pocket should insurance be used. Another way to reduce the cost is to bundle insurance policies such as motorcycle, automobile, home, or rental insurance.

Honda motorcycle riders have many ways to reduce the cost of their insurance. The discounts available via Discount Motorcycle Insurance help also, as the company has updated its database of online motorcycle discounts. For more information, go to www.discountmotorcycleinsurance.com.

About Discount Motorcycle Insurance:

Discount Motorcycle Insurance provides fast access to top motorcycle insurance companies by state or major city. Its website makes it easy for visitors to obtain free quotes quickly and learn from hundreds of articles on motorcycle insurance and related topics. The site is designed to help riders find lower insurance rates.

For more information visit http://www.discountmotorcycleinsurance.com

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http://www.rushlane.com/honda-activa-125-india-launch-12116560.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rushlane%2FAmZY+%28Rush+Lane%29

Honda Activa 125cc launched – four shades, two variants

Honda Activa 125cc was officially launched today in India. Though bookings and prices were revealed, first deliveries of the new Activa began today, after it was launched a few minutes ago in Mumbai. Priced from INR 56,607, ex-showroom, Mumbai, the new Honda Activa 125 is available in two variants, Standard and Deluxe. Activa Deluxe variant is at INR 62,588.

First showcased at 2014 Delhi Auto Expo earlier this year, Honda Activa 125cc will be powered by a 124.9cc four stroke SI engine offering peak power of 8.6 bhp at 6500 rpm and peak torque of 10.12 Nm at 5500 rpm. New Activa 125cc gets features such as optional disc brakes, tubeless tyres, combi brake system, digital meter, viscous air filter, MF battery and metal body. It sits on 10” rear alloy wheels and delivers fuel efficiency of 60 kmpl.

New Honda 125cc scooter gets telescopic front forks thereby resulting in better ability to handle bad road conditions while it has an instrument cluster that is an analogue-digital unit. To be offered in four exciting colours of blue, silver, black and white, Honda Activa 125 is now available across India, at all Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India dealerships.

Activa has become India’s best selling automatic scooter today. Not only that, it is now threatening India’s best selling two wheeler – Hero Splendor motorcycle. For two months last fiscal, Activa sales were higher than that of Splendor. And with new Activa 125 joining the Activa line-up, sales of Activa are only going to go North.

Honda sold a total of 37.5 lakh units of Activa last fiscal. Now, this fiscal, they aim to sell over 45 lakh units of Activa. Not only this, HMSI is also going to invest in opening new dealerships. By the end of next fiscal, they aim to have over 3,800 dealerships across India. Honda Activa 125cc will contend with the Suzuki Access 125 and Mahindra Duro in the 125cc automatic scooter segment.

Price of new Honda Activa 125 in your city.

Honda Activa 125 vs Vespa LX vs Mahindra Rodeo/Duro vs Suzuki Access/Swish

Read more at http://www.rushlane.com/honda-activa-125-india-launch-12116560.html#lCGHXKzYsQjmRb3k.99



Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #16 : Mai 18, 2014, 08:52:43 a.m. »
Compact, Affordable and Fun—The New 2015 Honda Pioneer 500 Side-By-Side

http://www.motorcycleworld.com/enthusiasts/news_article.asp?id=4237

With the addition of the all-new 2015 Pioneer 500™, Honda adds a heavy dose of fun to its line of side-by-sides. The Pioneer 500 carries two people to off-road adventures, is perfect for chores on the farm or a relaxed trail ride out in the country and it's packed with Honda's famous quality and durability at a suggested retail price of $8,499.


Torrance, CA - American Honda Motor Co.

"My first drive in the Pioneer 500 was an eye-opener," said Lee Edmunds, Manager of Motorcycle Marketing Communications. "It's really fun to drive, and the paddle shifters bring a whole different kind of experience that helps make it a blast. If you've been thinking about a side-by-side purchase, the Pioneer 500 will definitely put a grin on your face whether you're taking care of jobs around your property or taking off on a weekend adventure."

Only 50 inches wide, the Pioneer 500 fits on trails that impose width restrictions, as well as in the bed of a full-size truck. A modest 73.1-inch wheelbase helps return responsive handling and a tight turning radius of only 13 feet.

Designed by Honda R&D in Ohio, and built at Honda South Carolina (HSC) in Timmonsville using domestically and globally sourced parts, the Pioneer 500 is powered by Honda's proven 475cc four-stroke engine. This powerplant pumps out plenty of low-end torque along with a smooth, fun-to-use powerband. The five-speed gearbox with reverse uses an electric shift system featuring paddle shifters mounted on the steering column.

Thoughtful touches include a door/net setup that opens together as one unit—an ingenious and simple design. Inside, there's a roomy and comfortable bench seat for the driver and passenger. The Roll Over Protection Structure (ROPS) meets OSHA requirements, and driver and passenger have three-point Emergency Locking Retractor (ELR) seat belts.

There's also a full line of more than 40 Honda Genuine and Signature Accessories that allow owners to configure their Pioneer 500 to meet their specific needs right off the showroom floor.

With many people entering the growing side-by-side market, Honda now offers an all-new option to its Pioneer line. From long-time off-road enthusiasts to new side-by-side drivers, the compact, fun and affordable Pioneer 500 will become an instant favorite.

http://powersports.honda.com/2015/pioneer-500.aspx

About American Honda:

American Honda Motor Co., Inc. was established in 1959 and is the sole distributor of Honda motorcycles, scooters, ATVs and side-by-sides in the U.S. The American Honda Motorcycle Division is responsible for the sales, marketing, and operational activities for these products through authorized Honda dealers. For more information on Honda products, go to www.powersports.honda.com.


Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #17 : Mai 22, 2014, 08:43:07 a.m. »
http://www.rushlane.com/honda-cbr300r-india-test-12118551.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rushlane%2FAmZY+%28Rush+Lane%29

Honda CBR300R imported at declared value of Rs 2.93 lakhs

Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India, seems to have already begun their R&D on new CBR300R, which is expected to be launched by Diwali 2014. Making its world debut at the EICMA 2013 late last year, Honda CBR300R is imported in the country with a declared value of Rs 2.93 lakhs.

Honda CBR300R is currently produced at Honda’s Thailand facility. To be launched in India via the CKD route, 1 unit of CBR300R has already arrived in the country for R&D purpose. Honda India is in the process of ensuring that their new bike is compliant with our road conditions. Quality parts are being sourced from local suppliers while the bike is being put through trials where emission testing, fuel efficiency and other such details are concerned.

Honda promises that the new CBR300R will be a game changer once launched. It will sport a 286cc engine producing 30.4 bhp power at 8,500 rpm and 27 Nm torque at 7,250 rpm. This is more enhanced than power and performance seen on board the CBR250R. Apart from this, CBR300R is also lighter than the 250R by a good 8 kgs. This reduction in weight is due the incorporation of a new exhaust system and streamlining of chassis while Honda has also tweaked suspension and added better tyres for efficient handling.

Once successfully launched in India Honda CBR300R will compete efficiently with Kawasaki Ninja 300, and soon to be launched bikes like Mahindra Mojo 300, KTM RC 390, Hero HX250R and new Yamaha R25.

Read more at http://www.rushlane.com/honda-cbr300r-india-test-12118551.html#Vgq4FRkwARjL4l3U.99


Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #18 : Iunie 07, 2014, 08:50:44 a.m. »
http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/06/03/2015-honda-cbr300r-abs-first-look-sportbike-review-photos-specifications/

2015 Honda CBR300R/CBR300R ABS – First Look With an extra 37cc and a fresh new look, Honda’s new CBR300R arrives in August.

We knew the CBR300R was coming; the only question was when. Well, that time is just about here: The 2015 Honda CBR300R goes on sale in August, priced at $4,399 for the standard model and $4,899 for the version with ABS. For the record, the 2014 CBR250R remains on sale, priced at $4,199/$4,699, respectively.

We’d opt for the new CBR300R in a heartbeat. It’s only $200 more expensive, yet it’s liquid-cooled 286cc single produces a claimed 17 percent more power than the engine in the CBR250R. A new crankshaft and connecting rod increase the stroke of the new engine from 55mm to 63, bumping displacement by 37cc. That, together with remapped PGM-FI fuel injection, should translate to added power across the rev range and crisper throttle response.

Honda sees the new 2015 CBR300R as a great beginner bike that will also appeal to experienced riders. Based on our good experience with a long-term CBR250R, we’d have to agree. Further aiding the new CBR300R in this mission is a full fairing and dual headlights, which are evocative of the CBR1000RR, plus a new exhaust designed to enhance performance and create a throaty sound.

Other details on the 2015 Honda CBR300R include a new seat and side covers that make for an easier reach to the ground, plus an available accessory seat that reduces seat height by an inch. Genuine Honda accessories—each backed by a one-year warranty—include a carbon-look chain guard, chrome bar ends, a carbon-look lower fairing, color-matched seat cowls, a carbon-look front fender, a rear seat bag, a carbon-fiber tank pad, and a bike cover. The final list of accessories, says Honda, is still being determined.

Looks like a comparison test with the $4,999 Kawasaki Ninja 300, powered by a 296cc parallel twin, should be happening soon…

SPECIFICATIONS
   2015 Honda CBR300R / CBR300R ABS
ENGINE TYPE    286cc liquid-cooled single
BORE & STROKE    76.0mm x 63.0mm
COMPRESSION RATIO    10.7:1
VALVE TRAIN    dohc; four valves per cylinder
INDUCTION    PGM-FI, 38mm throttle body
IGNITION    Computer-controlled digital transistor with electronic advance
TRANSMISSION    Six-speed
FINAL DRIVE    #520 O-ring-sealed chain
FRONT SUSPENSION    37mm fork; 4.65 in. travel
REAR SUSPENSION    Pro-Link single shock with five-position spring preload adjustability; 4.07 in. travel
FRONT BRAKE    296mm disc, dual-piston caliper
REAR BRAKE    220mm disc, single-piston caliper (ABS on CBR300R ABS)
FRONT TIRE    110/70-17 radial
REAR TIRE    140/70-17 radial
WHEELBASE    54.3 in.
RAKE (CASTER ANGLE)    25° 30’
TRAIL    3.9 in.
SEAT HEIGHT    30.7 in.
FUEL CAPACITY    3.4 gal.
ESTIMATED FUEL ECONOMY    71 mpg
COLORS    Black, Red, Pearl White/Red/Blue, or Matte Black Metallic/Yellow
CLAIMED WET WEIGHT    357 lb. (CBR300R) / 364 lb. pounds (CBR300R ABS)


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http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/firstrides/2014_honda_vfr800_interceptor_first_ride/

2014 Honda VFR800 Interceptor | FIRST RIDE
Return of the All-Day Sportbike


They say: “Refined performance for today’s rider.”
We say: “Refinement goes before performance.”

A funny thing happened on the way to Adventure Touring bikes dominating the landscape. They killed the lightweight sport-touring machine. Think back. When the Honda VFR/Interceptor was at its technological peak, it was chased by machines like Aprilia's Futura, Ducati's ST series, Triumph's Sprint ST and GT. These were all machines with a sporting pedigree—some stronger than others—that embraced the idea of the "all-day sportbike." That is, a motorcycle more comfortable than a hard-core corner scratcher that didn't give up every inch of performance. Further up the scale, you have bikes like BMW's RT, Honda's own ST1300, the Kawasaki Concours 14, Yamaha's evergreen FJR1300, and more—all capable long-distance runners but so much bigger and heavier than any sportbike worthy of the title. So where did the riders who bought VFRs go when they wanted a new, multi-role, touring-capable bike? That's right: to ADVs.

But the lightweight-ST category is not totally dead—just ailing mightily—thanks to the 2014 Honda Interceptor. Yes, you can still call it the VFR800 if you want, and we'll all know what you're talking about, but the official title is just Interceptor. The machine you see here is not that far removed from the sixth-generation bike that was sold in the US from 2002 to 2009. (Honda's own conflicted VFR1200 pushed it from the showrooms in 2010.) But there are important and substantial changes that make the new bike a strong step up from the '09 Interceptor. If you own one of the sixth-generation bikes or are even hanging onto one of the fifth-gen VFRs (sold from 1998 to 2001), the new Interceptor should definitely be on your radar.

Honda is designing machines conservatively these days, at least from the development-cost perspective. Which is why the Interceptor's frame and engine carry over largely unchanged from the previous VFR. Beneath the unadorned plastic is the familiar 782cc, 90-degree V4 that appeared in 2002, replete with ordinary chain-driven cams (the previous engine serenaded you with gear-driven cams) and Honda's controversial VTEC. As before, the Interceptor version of VTEC simply disables two of the four valves in each cylinder on the premise that two-valve heads work better at low rpm.

After a bit of tweaking, Honda settled on an activation scheme that brought all four valves per cylinder into use at 6,400 rpm and kept them alive until the engine dropped below 6,100 rpm, which helped reduce the sudden surge of torque the 2002-2005 VFRs exhibited. This year, Honda gave the VFR new cam profiles that boost torque around the VTEC-activation range to help disguise the technology. (Yes, we have the same question: Why not dump it altogether?)

The twin-spar alloy frame is identical, though it does carry a new diecast-aluminum subframe instead of a steel-tube affair. It can do that because the exhaust system is now a rational single low pipe instead of the heavy, heat-casting under-seat affair it had before. An underbody bulge houses the catalyst, which helps keep its weight and heat transfer low in the chassis, away from your tender bits. But all the important stats like rake, trail, and wheelbase are all the same.

When you consider the last VFR was designed in the late 1990s, it shouldn't be a surprise to see the new machine get much more up-to-date running gear. Radial-mount Tokico calipers grace the fork, which only looks like it is an upside-down model. This Showa has conventional 43mm stanchions, cartridge damping control, and is adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping (but only on the Deluxe model, more on that later). At the rear is a Showa shock with adjustable preload and rebound damping; the Deluxe model gets a remote preload adjuster. Either model benefits from a revised single-sided swingarm with increased torsional rigidity. For '14, the Interceptor gets all-new 10-spoke, diecast-aluminum wheels.

Also on the Deluxe model, the Tokico calipers are backed up by an effective, lightweight ABS (alas, it's non-defeatable) and, unlike on the previous bike, are no longer linked. Some riders liked the brake linking, but no mechanic did; the new VFR's plumbing is considerably tidier.

Honda didn't stop with the major hardware, either. The entire fairing is new, featuring an X-styled, all-LED headlight and considerably narrower flanks, possible because the previously side-mounted radiators have been moved to where everyone else on the planet puts them: in front of the engines. (Still, to allow a desirably forward engine location, the radiators are split high and low, bracketing the front edge of the forward cylinder head.) Beneath the modestly sized bubble windscreen is a new instrument cluster with a large analog tach in the middle and a flurry of digital readouts flanking; they include everything you expect plus a gear-position indicator, average and instant fuel economy, ambient-air gauge, and a clock. Alas, no range-to-empty calculation.

A list of the changes might lead you to think the Interceptor has changed dramatically. Not so much in the flesh. It's a familiar shape and size, a really pleasant change from the often over-large ADV machines. A bit bigger and thicker in the middle than a current sportbike, sure, but the Interceptor looks and feels "right sized." Throw a leg over and you'll suspect the saddle is all-day comfortable (it is) and that the ergonomics walk a fine line between racer-committed and sit-up tour-y (they do). All the styling updates make the bike appear modern if not exactly cutting edge. Honda's insistence that the Interceptor's target audience eschews body graphics—on their bikes, anyway—is the reason.

Punch the button and Honda's little V4 awakes to a chum-chum-chum idle. It sounds quiet, smooth, and small. Throttle response is excellent in every condition, predictable and civilized even without ride by wire. At low rpm, the engine is extremely smooth, a faint tickle through the footpegs and just a shimmer coming through the handgrips. Above 9,000 rpm, though, the engine turns a little fizzy. Good thing it's geared tall; in sixth, 70 mph nets just a tick over 5,000 rpm, where the engine feels almost lazy. Perfect for putting on the big miles.

If you're looking for big smiles, you'll need more revs. Keep the engine in the VTEC zone and above for that. You'll feel power starting to get serious by 7,000 rpm, after which the busted-lifter clatter signaling VTEC transition is over, with a nice, predictable build right to the 11,500-rpm redline. In fact, the rev limiter lets you have a bit more than that; more than once we noticed the tach well into the red before the fun stopped. And, oh, the sounds: nothing quite like a V4's distinctive high-rpm growl. Good news on the VTEC front: The extra torque in the midrange nicely masks VTEC activation. Most, but not all of the time, anyway. Perfection? Nope. Better than before? Definitely.

Emotionally, that grin comes with something close to "ah, that's nice" than "holy cow, this thing is fast!" Truth is, the V4 sounds great and is plenty tractable, but VTEC VFRs peak at less than 100 rear-wheel horsepower. Honda doesn't make power claims for the new bike, so we're not expecting much more when we strap our soon-to-arrive testbike to the dyno. And while the V4 fails to threaten the odd GSX-R750 for dyno domination, it is at least gifted with a fantastic transmission, tight driveline, and smooth, positive-acting clutch—still without a slipper mechanism, though.

If Honda's engine work provides only small improvements, the chassis updates make up for them. Suspension rates are a fine compromise, smooth over pebbly-rough pavement but still firm enough to keep chassis motions in check. While the Interceptor isn't light—Honda claims 536 pounds for the Deluxe model, full of gas, which is 27 pounds heavier than the cheaper Kawasaki Ninja 1000—it rarely feels heavy once underway. Steering, too, is a compromise. It never feels really light or flickable, but the VFR turns in positively and holds a line tenaciously. You can whomp on the newly powerful brakes without the chassis wanting to stand up and change your trajectory. Even so, the VFR seems happiest at a "gentleman's" pace, meaning smooth but decisive inputs, an early choice of line, and careful consideration of gearing, lest you fall into one of the big gaps in the lower ratios. If you let it drop out of the top third of the rev band, you'll feel like you're going backward.

If you find yourself on straight, boring roads between your playgrounds of choice, no problem. The VFR abides. There's just enough wind protection to ease fatigue but not enough to make it feel stuffy in summer. As mentioned, the riding position is just about the perfect compromise. Compact and slightly aggressive but not committed. If you owned a non-GSX-R sportbike in the 1990s, you'll recognize the sensation. If you've grown too old since then, be happy that Honda will sell riser plates to move the bars 13mm up and 6mm back. The onboard trip computer said we averaged 40 mpg despite a full morning of redline chasing, so the 5.6-gallon tank should be good for more than 200 miles. Add in a silky smooth engine and excellent heat management...and you know why the VFR has lasted so long.

Compared to the previous-generation Interceptor, the new one has a slightly better engine feel—if no more power—usefully firmer and smoother suspension, and radically upgraded brakes. All good things.

Now for some confusion. Honda will sell two versions, the base model and Deluxe. For $13,499 you get the fully loaded Deluxe, which includes ABS and on-the-fly switchable traction control, heated grips, adjustable fork, remotely adjustable shock, centerstand, and self-canceling turnsignals. Jump down $1,000 to the base model and you lose all of that, meaning, in part, you have no fork adjustments at all and have to whip out a wrench to change rear preload. If you go to Honda's accessory list and begin adding back those features, you'll be only halfway down before you get to the Deluxe's price. Our advice? Don't even look at the base bike.

There are still more accessories for the VFR, including a top box and hard saddlebags. The side bags slot into mounts already part of the rear bodywork. With the bags removed, the Interceptor still looks sleek. Color matched, the saddlebags retail for less than $1,000. A quickshifter is also an option, though the initial testbikes were not so fitted.

It's obvious that Honda listened to the small band of devoted Interceptor owners before embarking on a substantial if not exactly overwhelming rework of the VFR. It's refined and improved without moving away from the core strengths that have made it a modest (though enduring) success. Will the new Interceptor keep riders out of BMW showrooms and off of R1200GSs? Probably not too many of them, but for the hard-core VFR fan, this version is like finding a brand-new set of your favorite jeans at the back of the closet. Not the latest fashion, but something you're happy to slip into.

2014 HONDA INTERCEPTOR DELUXE
Price    $13,499
Engine type    l-c 90° V4
Valve train    DOHC, 16v
Displacement    782cc
Bore x stroke    72.0 x 48.0mm
Compression    11.8:1
Fuel system    EFI
Clutch    Wet, multi-plate
Transmission    6-speed
Frame    Aluminum twin-spar
Front suspension    Showa 43mm fork adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping
Rear suspension    Showa shock adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping
Front brake    Dual Tokico four-piston calipers, 310mm discs with ABS
Rear brake    Tokico two-piston caliper, 256mm disc with ABS
Front tire    180/55ZR-17 Dunlop Sportmax
Rear tire    120/70ZR-17 Dunlop Sportmax
Rake/trail    25.5°/3.7 in.
Seat height    31.0/31.8 in.
Wheelbase    57.4 in.
Fuel capacity    5.6 gal.
Wet weight (claimed)    536 lb.
Colors    Red, Pearl White
Available    Now
Warranty    12 mo., unlimited mi.
Contact    powersports.honda.com

Read more: http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/firstrides/2014_honda_vfr800_interceptor_first_ride/#ixzz33vh9MMHb












Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #19 : Iulie 03, 2014, 09:14:43 a.m. »
2014 Honda CBR650F – First Ride A sensible sportbike at a reasonable price.

http://www.cycleworld.com/2014/07/01/2014-honda-cbr650f-first-ride-sportbike-review-photos-specifications/

Let’s see…it’s about 40 pounds heavier than other middleweight sportbikes. It also makes a lot less horsepower than other middleweight sportbikes. Which means, logically enough, that it can’t be nearly as fast as other middleweight sportbikes. So, you probably are asking, what was Honda thinking with the new CBR650F?

Well, Honda’s thinking was that not everyone wants, needs, or can easily use the impressive power that middleweight supersports only produce at stratospherically high rpm. Honda also was thinking that for riders who use motorcycles for much more than the occasional run along a winding backroad, the full-tuck ergos of middleweight sportbikes can be more of a painful turn-off than a pleasant turn-on. Maybe most important, Honda was thinking that a more-comfortable, easier-to-ride middleweight sportbike that sells for three grand less than the company’s own CBR600RR repli-racer was an excellent idea.

The final verdict will be decided by the buying public, of course. But based on my one-day ride through the endless twisties near Malibu, California, during the CBR650F’s press introduction, along with a bit of open-road cruising on famous Pacific Coast Highway, Honda’s thinking may be spot-on.

First of all, the CBR650F is not, in any way, shape, or form, a rehash of some other model. It’s 100-percent new from the ground up, a fresh design built in Honda’s ever-expanding Thailand facility. And old-school riders can rejoice, as the 650F takes a decidedly low-tech, low-cost approach with a twin-spar steel frame instead of aluminum, a non-adjustable conventional fork, non-radial-mount twin-piston front brakes, a dohc engine that’s all-new but breaks no new ground, and an absence of electronic rider aids except for a $500-more-expensive ABS model.

If all this makes you think the CBR650F is a slug, a bargain bike that disappoints in every way except price, think again. The 649cc dohc engine was specifically designed for stronger low-end and midrange than your typical 600-class supersport, a goal achieved through systematic tuning and added displacement. As a result, the 650 pulls steadily from as low as 3000-4000 rpm and accelerates the claimed 461-pound (with the 4.5-gallon gas tank fully topped) machine up through the gears to its 11,400-rpm redline quickly enough to get the rider’s attention and keep it there. It’s no match for a 600cc repli-racer in pure acceleration; but on many curvy backroads, especially ones with tight corners and short straights, the 650F could either run wheel-to-wheel with a good 600 supersport or at least keep it in sight.

Obviously, then, despite its unremarkable specifications, the CBR-F also handles quite well. The steering is not as lightning-quick as on the expensive middleweights, but it still lets you flick into and out of corners with surprising ease, and it remains neutral all through the turn. There’s lots of lean angle possible before the side stand on the left and fairing lower on the right inform you that you’ve tilted the horizon far enough. And even though the only suspension adjustment is the shock’s seven-position spring preload, there’s no wallowing or other instability as you carve around turns.

I did experience a bit of rear-tire slide with the 180/55-17 Dunlop Sportmax D222 when accelerating at deep lean angles, but not enough to cause concern. Actually, that may be a testament to the engine’s healthy middle-rpm output more than a criticism of the tire. Nevertheless, whatever impression you might have when bombing corners on a CBR650F, it won’t be that you’re saddled with a cheapo bike that’s not up to the task.

Same goes for comfort. The riding position is more sport-touring than tucked-in racer, with clip-on handlebars mounted above the top triple-clamp instead of below, footpegs that don’t bend knees into such extreme angles, and a seat that, despite having thicker padding, is a skosh lower than those on other sporty middleweights. These ergonomics allow good bike control when charging through corners while also promising to make everyday commutes and weekend rides more ecstasy than agony.

Even the 650’s rudimentary suspension causes no discomfort in ride quality. The fork and shock soak up most road imperfections without harshness or bottoming, with only the deepest and most sharp-edged bumps delivering any kind of thump through the seat.

No complaints about the 650F’s braking, either, regardless of the system’s lack of sophistication. Constant full-throttle acceleration/hard braking, even during long, sustained downhill charges through tight corners, produced no fade or diminished slowing. And the ABS was so completely transparent that I often forgot it was there.

Visually, the CBR650F certainly looks modern enough. The full fairing has sharp, crisp lines with a conventional headlight flanked by LED “marker lights”; the taillight is an LED unit, as well. The dual-panel instrument display is all digital except for a tachometer that uses multiple LCD elements to mimic an analog tach. Conversely, the 4-into-1 exhaust system’s long headers pay homage to those on the classic 1974 Honda CB400F as they sweep gracefully into a short, right-side muffler. The standard model lists for $8,499 and is available in red, candy blue and matte black metallic; the ABS model is $8,999 and comes only in black.

After all is said and done, the reasoning behind the CBR650F is the same as that employed by most bike manufacturers these days: getting more people on two wheels by using simplicity, affordability, and ease of riding instead of record-setting performance and cutting-edge technology. Yamaha’s approach is with fun-loving FZ-07 and FZ-09 nakeds, while Kawasaki does it with multitalented Versys and Ninja 650 twins. Honda has used a broader tactic, first with economy-minded NC and CTX 700s, then with a trio of 500cc twins. The CBR650F is just the latest offering to spring from that mindset.

And it appears to be a very good one. All the journalists at the press launch were pleasantly surprised by the 650—not just with its engine and chassis performance but also with its overall sense of quality. None of us ever felt like we were riding a cut-rate motorcycle.

Our final judgment of the CBR650F will have to wait for a full test, including the bike’s long-ride comfort potential and evaluation by other members of the CW staff. But so far, Honda appears to have hit a home run—or at least a pretty impressive three-bagger.

SPECIFICATIONS
   2014 Honda CBR650F/CBR650F ABS
PRICE    $8499/$8999
ENGINE TYPE    649cc liquid-cooled inline four-cylinder
BORE & STROKE    67.0mm x 46.0mm
COMPRESSION RATIO    11.4:1
VALVE TRAIN    DOHC; four valves per cylinder
INDUCTION    PGM-FI with automatic enrichment, 32mm throttle bodies
IGNITION    Digital transistorized with electronic advance
TRANSMISSION    Six-speed
FINAL DRIVE    #525 O-ring-sealed chain
FRONT SUSPENSION    41mm fork; 4.3 inches travel
REAR SUSPENSION    Single shock with spring preload adjustability; 5.0 inches travel
FRONT BRAKE    Dual twin-piston calipers with 320mm discs
REAR BRAKE    Single-caliper with 240mm disc
OPTIONAL BRAKES    Honda ABS (CBR650F ABS)
FRONT TIRE    120/70ZR-17 Dunlop Sportmax D222
REAR TIRE    180/55ZR-17 Dunlop Sportmax D222
WHEELBASE    57.0 in.
RAKE (CASTER ANGLE)    25.50°
TRAIL    101.3mm (3.98 in.)
SEAT HEIGHT    31.9 in.
FUEL CAPACITY    4.5 gal.
COLORS    Red, Candy Blue, Matte Black Metallic
CLAIMED WET WEIGHT    461 lb. (CBR650F) / 467 pounds (CBR650F ABS)




Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #20 : Iulie 15, 2014, 08:01:20 a.m. »
http://www.sportrider.com/sportbikes/2014-honda-cbr650f-first-ride-review

2014 Honda CBR650F First Ride Review

Your middle wait is over as Honda fills the void between its CBR500R and 600RR models

This might not be the Honda that you were expecting or even waiting for, but it’s here. A simple, smooth, and fun-to-ride entry-level middleweight sportbike that Honda originally introduced alongside its naked counterpart, the CB650F, last year at the EICMA show in Milan. Enter the all-new 2014 Honda CBR650F.

Honda has clearly targeted entry-level and step-up riders with recent additions to their lineup that include last year’s 500cc CB and CBR, new CBR300R, and even the VFR800 Interceptor, which, displacement-wise, drops neatly under the CB1000R in Big Red’s Sport line. But unlike the Interceptor, which returns with a frame and engine that are basically carry-overs from the previous VFR model, the 2014 CBR650F is all-new and shares almost no components with previous or existing models in the lineup. Purpose-built as they say, and Honda’s purpose was to provide a mid-displacement sportbike with supersport styling and a level of performance above the parallel-twin 500cc engine. Honda’s product planning guys refer to it as “step-up performance.”

In that respect, they’ve succeeded. But is it “remarkably affordable,” as Honda puts it, or comparably priced for middleweight newcomers and small-bike graduates? That depends. If you’re comparing price points within the Honda line, the CBR650F falls slightly on the lower side of the gap that it fills, coming in at $3,000 less than the CBR600RR and $2,200 more than the CBR500R. But compare the Honda’s base $8,499 MSRP with retail pricing of the Kawasaki Ninja 650, Yamaha FZ-07, and Suzuki SFV650, and you might say that the CBR650F needs to justify its place on the Big Four scale.

To get acquainted with the new CBR-F, Honda invited motojournalists on a one-day ride through the canyons above Malibu. The endless maze of winding roads above the famous Pacific Coast Highway is where LA-area sportbike riders and cruisers go to unwind on Saturdays and Sundays, and weekend traffic is almost always a challenge if not a downright hazard. Luckily, our press ride took place mid-week and we had the Mulholland twisties all to ourselves.

With a 67mm x 46mm bore and stroke yielding its 649cc displacement, the CBR650F’s inline-four engine delivers what it promises with smooth acceleration and useable torque in the low 4,000 to 6,000 rpm range and its strongest pull coming on noticeably as the LCD tach bars sweep up to 7,000 rpm before starting to flatten out just above the 10,000 rpm mark (the red zone starts at 11,400rpm on the LCD tach). A cable-actuated clutch disengages with a very light pull on the lever and shifting through the six gears is faultless.

The engine is a stressed member of the CBR-F’s steel twin-spar frame bolted into place with aluminum hangers at a point that achieves close to a 50/50 distribution of weight between the axles. A cast aluminum swingarm is suspended by a single shock with 5 inches of rear travel. Up front, the 41mm right-side-up fork is non-adjustable and provides 4.3 inches of travel. The rear shock is valved on the heavy side with a light spring but the main drawback is the lack of rebound adjustability. The only adjustment that can be made to the suspension is at the rear with seven detents of spring preload.

    A seat height of 31.9 inches is not necessarily low, however a nice taper where the inner thighs rest makes it easier for shorter legs to reach the ground.

At two clicks up on the preload (factory setting), the ride around town was plush enough for daily commuting without feeling unstable or unpredictable as we worked our way into a curvy section of road. Once we were up in the fun section of the ride, we pulled into a turnout and added two more clicks of preload, which enabled the CBR650F to handle the tight, narrow roads with a slightly sportier feel. There is no dive into the corners and steering is not super-light by supersport standards, which is a good thing for less aggressive riders who want a more predictable feel. Mid-turn bumps did not upset handling, a characteristic that we found to be a nice compromise for daily commuting and weekend rides through the twisties.


Dual 320mm wave-type rotors up front provide strong stopping capability with easy one-finger modulation on the lever. The brakes remained consistent throughout the day under heavy acceleration and stopping. The rear brake on our test bike grabbed quickly making it a little more difficult to modulate. For an additional $500 over base, you can get Honda’s ABS system for added panic-stop confidence. (The ABS model is available only matte black.) Fortunately, there was no discernible difference in lever feel or stopping performance between the ABS and non-ABS bikes that we rode. Aside from the optional ABS upgrade, there are no sophisticated electronic rider aids to drive up the price. The LCD dash is basic and easy to read with excellent day and nighttime visibility. With the CBR650F’s more upright sport-touring rider position, airflow coming off of the top of the small windscreen was a buffeting factor at 60mph and above. A seat height of 31.9 inches is not necessarily low, however a nice taper where the inner thighs rest makes it easier for shorter legs to reach the ground.

Overall sport-oriented ergos with above-the-tree clip-ons and a slight rise to the bars offer a comfortable, semi-upright seated position with all of the controls where they should be. While the seating position is more upright than a 600RR, the CBR650F puts the rider at a slight forward tilt that helps to keep you positioned closer to the front-hinged tank for a sporty feel and better weight distribution. Honda offers the CBR650F in two eye-grabbing colors, red or blue, along with a stealthier matte black for the wicked, low-key look. The new bodywork is clean and angular with more of the engine visible than most fully faired sportbikes. A short list of Honda accessories include a rear trunk or rack, heated grips, rear hugger, color-matched solo seat cowl, wheel stripes, carbon fiber tank pad and a sport windscreen for buyers who need to add some personal touches.

Stay tuned for a comparison test between the CBR650F and its most obvious competition, the Kawasaki Ninja 650 and Yamaha FZ-07 included!

Specifications    :

2014 Honda CBR650F    

MSRP:    $8,499 ($8,999 with ABS)
Engine    
Type    Liquid-cooled DOHC inline-four cylinder, 4 valves/cyl
Displacement    649cc
Bore x stroke    67 x 46mm
Compression ratio    11.4:1
Induction    PGM-FI, single-valve 32mm throttle bodies, single injectors/cyl.
Chassis    
Front Tire    120/70ZR-17 Dunlop D222F
Rear Tire    180/55ZR-17 Dunlop D222
Rake/trail    25.5 deg./ 3.98 in. (101.3mm)
Wheelbase    57.0 in. (1448mm)
Seat height    31.9 in. (810mm)
Fuel Capacity    4.5 gal. (17.0L)
Claimed wet weight    461 lb. (209kg); 467 lb. (212kg)

=============

http://www.ridermagazine.com/manufacturer/honda/touring-southern-british-columbia-on-a-honda-cbr1100xx.htm/

Touring Southern British Columbia on a Honda CBR1100XX


The airport security agent lingered on my helmet bag. “I’m just trying to decide whether to hassle you,” she said without smiling. “You rode here on a motorcycle?”

“No, ma’am, but I’ll need gear at my destination.”

“You’re flying somewhere to ride a motorcycle? Where?”

“British Columbia.”

“Right. Please remove all objects from your pockets….”

My helmet and I passed muster, and before long I was flying west on a bucket-list trip for my 50th birthday. In a few hours, by the curb outside arrivals, I met Dale for the first time. On an Internet rider forum we both frequent, I had grown to admire his sophistication with words; it didn’t surprise me to learn that he was an English professor. When the opportunity arose to connect in person, Dale offered to share his insights, developed over several decades, on a tour of the Pacific Northwest.

He also offered the key to his Blackbird.

When introduced in 1996, Honda’s CBR1100XX Super Blackbird was the fastest production motorcycle on the planet. Dale’s well-kept example is from 1999, the first year with fuel injection. He set it up for sport touring with soft luggage, heated grips, cruise control and a convex windscreen, and I was eager to savor southern BC’s varied landscapes aboard this open-class legend.

We boarded a ferry in Anacortes, Washington, bound for Sidney on Vancouver Island. Dale chose the scenic run through the San Juan Islands where sights included beautiful waterfront homes, distant snowcapped mountains through broken cloud cover and the picturesque port town of Friday Harbor.

One thing I learned researching my first-ever trip to British Columbia is to keep the Vancouvers straight. There’s Vancouver Island. There’s also the City of Vancouver, but that’s on the mainland. To further complicate things, the State of Washington has its own City of Vancouver, down south near Oregon. All were named for British Royal Navy Captain George Vancouver who commanded an expedition of the Pacific Northwest in the 1790s.

Vancouver Island is the largest island on the west coast of North America and the largest Pacific island east of New Zealand. The population is concentrated around Victoria, the provincial capital. Our plans involved riding away from population centers, but this beautiful city—which has been described as more English than England–was hard to resist.
Seals in Victoria’s Inner Harbour

Seals in Victoria’s Inner Harbour are accustomed to handouts from tourists, but I wasn’t sharing my halibut.

Our visit downtown revealed double-decker buses, horse-drawn carriages and historic Parliament buildings. The ivy-covered Empress Hotel offered a proper high tea to people dressed more appropriately than we were. Instead, we rode to the Inner Harbour boardwalk and dined on halibut with French fries, among the best “fish and chips” dishes I’ve had anywhere. Victoria is also known as the “City of Gardens” and the English-style Butchart Gardens in nearby Brentwood Bay were captivating, even for crusty long-distance motorcyclists.

To escape crowds, we headed for the island’s interior. It’s largely uninhabited and few roads pass through, but in the south one that does is Pacific Marine Road. At Duncan, we turned west on Highway 18 and at Lake Cowichan followed signs for Port Renfrew. Stands of tall timber were punctuated by occasional clear cuts, evidence that these were managed forestlands. The forest’s deep green was a rich complement to a varied gray sky. The Blackbird was an eager partner around tight curves and across narrow bridges, but prudent restraint was in order as rain had been falling all day, little surprise in this temperate rain forest.

Port Renfrew was noted on the map, but it was more of an outpost than a town. Had I known, I’d have planned my gas stops better. The Blackbird’s range is 100 miles less than my ST1300 and we had to consult with locals twice to locate the area’s only source of gasoline. It was at a marina on a reservation, and it wasn’t on the GPS. Luckily the marina store was staffed, the trailer-mounted “gas station” had fuel for sale and the merchant took American cash. Amazingly, the price was the same as I paid in the city the day before.
Air Cadet Squadron 217

This T33 aircraft near Princeton honors Air Cadet Squadron 217. It’s also a weather vane.

Port Renfrew is near the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, so many major shipwrecks occurred here that these waters became known as the Graveyard of the Pacific. Regrettably, we had to pass on a side trip to see for ourselves at Botanical Beach. Getting there required hiking a wilderness trail that would be challenging even with the right gear and good conditions, and we had neither.

The hard rain let up as we wound our way southeast on Highway 14, the scenic West Coast Road. Firs obscured much of the ocean view but a deep breath confirmed that salt water was nearby. As sunshine and blue skies prevailed, this winding shore road unfolded rapidly. It was amazing to realize the Blackbird held more than 100 mph in reserve.

Ferries between Vancouver Island and the mainland are frequent and convenient. Though our plan to ride away from major population areas continued, the City of Vancouver beckoned. We stopped for a view of the skyline along the harbor, and then worked our way through downtown. At a square surrounded by flagpoles, each with a Maple Leaf at rest in the calm, a blackbird perched like a living finial. Was it sizing up its namesake Honda below?

In Stanley Park, sunshine was providing ideal conditions for two outdoor events: a cricket match and a wedding. The bowlers and batsmen were busy, but a group of bridesmaids said hello as they walked to their photo op by the water. I lingered by a display of totem poles and read the detailed descriptions of their symbolism to gain some insight into the First Nation cultures of the Pacific Northwest.

Dale led us across historic Lions Gate Bridge and continued north on British Columbia Highway 99, the Sea to Sky Highway. This road used to be known colloquially as “death highway” due to a treacherous history of rockslides. Cars had been crushed by falling boulders and smashed down the cliffs into Howe Sound. A blockage in 1990 required tourists stranded in Whistler to be evacuated by boats and helicopters.

In advance of the 2010 Winter Olympics, the road received a major upgrade to better connect the venues of Vancouver and Whistler, 75 miles apart. The result? Motorcycle nirvana. This warm Saturday afternoon found many riders enjoying the curves and testing their luck with speed enforcement. Stunning scenery was all around, but atop the Blackbird my focus was fixed on snaking asphalt. What a hoot! As we gained elevation, the landscape transitioned to the snowcapped mountains that helped make Whistler a world-class destination for winter sports.

Our friends Seppo and Pirjo offered to put us up overnight in Whistler, and that evening the town was alive in the aftermath of a Tough Mudder event, where participants trekked across a brutal, mud-laden, 10-mile obstacle course and raised funds for the Wounded Warrior Project. Crowds of fit, yet tired, people walked the Village Stroll proudly sporting “Tough Mudder Finisher” shirts.
Butchart Gardens, Brentwood Bay

Jennie Butchart started the world-famous Butchart Gardens, near Victoria in Brentwood Bay, in 1904. They are extraordinary.

Morning found us back on Highway 99 continuing northeast to the Pemberton Valley. The section of 99 called Duffey Lake Road has sweepers and hairpins and elevation changes galore. A young rider on a sportbike couldn’t seem to pull away from the ’bird and eventually waved us around. We wore grins under our helmets all the way to Lillooet. The landscape transitioned again, from the deep green of fir into the paler greens of pine and sagebrush. Our plan to ride Highway 12 south along the Fraser River was sidetracked by a landslide. It’s for unexpected times like these that I carry paper maps. We rerouted to Cache Creek and then wound down 97C through Highland Valley. This detour was twisty fun and by Merritt we were back on our intended route.

In Princeton, we happened upon a great piece of roadside British Columbia: a T33 jet mounted on a pole and dedicated to Air Cadet Squadron 217. I pulled over to get a photograph of two birds together. I positioned the Blackbird at just the right angle and readied my camera, but then the angle was different. A breeze revealed that the plane was a weather vane. With winds light and variable, I took photos as the plane rotated through a range of positions.
Whistler

North of Whistler, this cairn seems ready to embrace the Blackbird.

Another landslide figured into our ride later that afternoon. Along the Similkameen River west of Keremeos, traffic on Highway 3 was suddenly at full stop. Motorists were already out of their cars and walking around when we pulled up. Word had filtered back from those farther on that a slide brought down power lines and started a brush fire. An alternate route would add hours to our day’s ride, so we decided to wait it out. A traveler from Alberta took advantage of a captive audience and pulled out his bagpipes. Two young men from Québec joined in, playing a conga and a jaw harp.

The music stopped when brake lights ahead signaled cars were getting ready to move. A few clicks up the road, firefighters had controlled the blaze enough that one lane was opened. Dale and I continued on this scenic stretch of Highway 3 to the border crossing at Osoyoos, and one more encounter with security. I handed the border guard my passport.

“Your bike looks fast,” she said.

Actually it’s his bike, ma’am, but yes, it’s fast. You could say it flies.”

Such was the flight of the Blackbird.

(This article Flight of the Blackbird was published in the July 2014 issue of Rider magazine.)

==============


« Ultima Modificare: Iulie 15, 2014, 08:14:43 a.m. de tokyodream »

Offline tokyodream

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #21 : Iulie 26, 2014, 09:29:22 a.m. »
http://indianexpress.com/article/auto-travel/bikes/honda-launches-2014-version-of-cb-shine-125cc-motorcycle/

Honda launches 2014 version of CB Shine 125cc motorcycle

Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India Pvt. Ltd introduced the latest iteration of the popular 125cc CB Shine motorcycle today. The latest iteration of one of the best selling motorcycles in the segment has been refreshed and now sports better styling. It comes with 2 new colors Pearl Amazing White and Dual Tone Red and Black. These two new colors completely enhance the looks of the motorcycle and makes it contemporary. The newly updated CB Shine will continue to be available with existing color options of Black, Geny Grey Metallic and Rebel Red Metallic.

Due to its consistent sales in the market the CB Shine has been ranked as the largest selling 125 in the market today. Due to the high demand for the product Honda has regularly updated the model with new and improved features. It comes with the best of Honda technology and provides the best of performance and reliability. More than 30 lac customers have chosen to own and ride this motorcycle since its launch in 2006. The new color scheme adds value to the bike as it now looks trendier than ever before.

The ‘Optimax’ 125cc engine remains untouched and produces 10.3 Bhp of power which ensures a great balance of performance and fuel efficiency. This is possible due to Honda’s cutting edge engine technology being implemented. “CB Shine is the largest selling 125cc motorcycle in India. Acknowledging the evolving customer needs, Honda has regularly reinvented the model. Maintaining crisp power with time trusted Honda technology, the new style sheet will further up the style quotient of CB Shine and reaffirm it’s as a true Winners’ Choice,”said Mr. Y.S. Guleria, Vice President, Sales & Marketing, HMSI.

CB Shine brings an ‘Ergo Tec’ design which employs a diamond frame which is lightweight ensuring good handling capabilities while the suspension ensures adequate comfort. The CB Shine has very good ride quality which makes it the perfect tool for commuting every day. CB Shine comes with a number of good features such as tubeless tyres, optional disc brake and Self/Kick Start for convenience. The new CB Shine is available in three different variants. The base variant Kick Drum Spoke has been priced at ex-showroom New Delhi price of Rs. 47,341. The middle variant Self-Drum Alloy has been priced at Rs. 51,015 while the top variant Self-Disc Alloy with all the goodies has been priced at Rs. 54,051.

(Powered by Gaadi.com)

===============

http://www.dirtrider.com/features/2015-honda-crf250r-first-impression/

2015 Honda CRF250R First Impression

The latest 2015 motocross model to be released this season is the CRF250R, and the mid-sized Honda brings with it some interesting new features. After being completely redesigned in 2014, the Honda now receives some small updates to the engine and chassis, and a big surprise by way of the front suspension. The CRF250R has historically done well in back-to-back comparisons among its classmates, and on its own the Honda has become known as a solid performer with excellent durability and strong racing roots. The 2015 model is no different in this regard.

First and foremost on the list of changes to the new CRF250R is a new Showa Separate Function Air TAC Fork, which offers increased adjustability and lighter weight (more on the specifics in a moment). Likewise, the shock has new settings—specifically, a stiffer spring that also weighs less—to account for the fork change and maintain the balance of the bike. The Honda’s front brake rotor has been increased in size 20mm (to 260mm total) for a more progressive feel. Redesigned exhaust graces the back end; the mufflers diameter is larger in order to provide more low end for the bike. Revised fuel-mapping settings were added for smoother acceleration and better throttle response. On the tuning side, there are now three preset maps built into the CRF250R that can be adjusted via the appropriately named Engine Mode Select Button. By pushing and holding this killswitch-like button on the right side of the handlebar, the rider can select between stock, soft, and aggressive maps. Finally, Dunlop’s new MX52 tires—with a directional front and block-within-a-block technology—grace the 2015 Honda.

Before we get into the nitty gritty of the opinions, a bit more explanation on the fork is necessary. You may have seen the recent first test of the Kawasaki KX450F (http://www.dirtrider.com/features/2015-kawasaki-kx450f-first-test/), as well as our explanation video of the new fork (http://www.dirtrider.com/features/showa-separate-function-triple-chamber-air-fork-explained/). Well, forget most of what you know about the Triple Air Chamber (TAC) fork, because the Honda’s is different. Although still made by Showa, the Honda’s fork features a unique design that they feel is superior and works better for their bike. Gone is the external balance chamber at the bottom of the fork foot; this is internal on the Honda, and is filled via a Schrader valve at the bottom of the left leg. Yes, you heard that correctly, the left leg. While the Kawasaki’s Separate Function Air Fork features springing action (ie. Air) on the right and damping on the left, the Honda’s setup sports damping on the right and the air setup on the left leg. Why, you ask? Great question! The answer is that the spring (air) side of the fork is lighter than the damping side of the fork, and Honda feels that when you factor in the additional weight of the front brake on the left leg, it makes more sense to balance things out by having the lighter fork on the left. Overall, the elimination of the steel springs over last year’s unit makes for a weight savings of 2.8 pounds.
As with the Kawasaki’s SFF-Air front suspension, the Honda’s setup features an inner chamber that has a stock setting of 174 PSI and effectively controls the spring rate of the bike. Additionally, the balance chamber (found at the bottom of the fork) provides negative force, which handles the action at the initial portion of the travel and can be adjusted to changes the attitude of the bike (for example, decreasing air pressure in the balance chamber actually raises the front end up, while increasing the pressure will help pull the front end down). The tricky part is in the outer chamber, which differs from the Kawasaki’s in that it contains oil and ambient air pressure, and does not need to be adjusted. It is theoretically possible to add a Schrader valve to the top of the fork leg and increase the pressure in the outer chamber, but Honda neither recommend nor discourages this; they simply state that the outer chamber pressure should be left alone (although you can alter the oil volume in the outer chamber for further adjustment).

On the track, the revised motor still feels like a 2014 but with the added option of going to a smoother ignition map setting or an aggressive setting for a total of three types of power curves. In stock form (or the standard map setting), the CRF feels somewhat smooth when rolling the throttle on and builds calculated RPMs in a steady manner. We say “calculated” because there is not a whole lot of excitement from the bottom end. Once in the mid range the bike pulls harder and feels like it can get around the track well, you just have to keep your finger on the clutch to make sure the revs are high. Take note, this is not a lugging type of motor. You have to be more aggressive with the Honda in order to get it to really rail. However, down long, fast straights and fast sections, the bike pulls quite well and has a decent amount of over-rev. The Honda doesn’t fall flat on its face when asked to pull a gear longer than it should. Since we felt that the CRF250R was a little smoother feeling out of corners (and the fact Honda had the 2015 introduction at Competitive Edge MX Park took place at 3,400ft above sea level), using the smooth map didn’t make much sense on this day. We will try the smoother ignition setting on different types of tracks and terrain once we get the bike in our hands full time. The aggressive map was the best setting for both our intermediate and pro tester riders. The aggressive map woke the power up down low and let the bike pull even harder in the mid range. Coming out of corners, the CRF250R pulled harder and gave us added throttle response. Top end and over-rev did suffer a little once you are in this mode. Even when the track turned hard packed and choppy the aggressive setting was still the preferred setting.

 

As mentioned, the big change to the 2015 Honda CRF250R is the Showa Separate Function Air Fork. Our heavier tester wanted the fork to hold up more in the stroke on jump faces and under heavy braking, so for him 8 psi was taken out in the balance chamber (again, taking air out lets the fork hold up in the stroke better). This helped keep the CRF more balanced around the entire track. Our lighter tester felt like the front end wanted to stand up coming into corners so he opted to go up 15 psi in the balance chamber (putting air in lets the fork drop in its stroke more) giving him a more planted feel entering rutted corners. The overall comfort of the SFF Air was perceived well from both testers once their final settings were made. The front end of the bike was predictable and over the course of the day we didn’t feel much change in its overall feel. We have tried other air forks in the past where we found a good setting only to be let down later in the day when the air pressure rises inside the fork (due to heat, pressure buildup, etc). While comfort in the shock was maintained via the new, heavier spring, we still felt like it was a little too soft on landings and g-outs. Increasing low speed compression and going stiffer on the high speed by a quarter turn made the rear of the bike hold up and kept its comfort coming out of corners. Additionally, we slowed down the rebound the help calm the back end.

The new 260mm front rotor is a nice touch and gone is the mushy feeling of last year’s front brake. Stopping the Honda takes less pull of the lever and it is not too grabby to the touch. The new black accents and revised graphics on the Honda are also very attractive and give the red machine an overall cool look. The MX52 tires are a welcome addition, but we actually prefer the MX32s for most tracks here in Southern California.

 

At this point, we intend to put more time on the 2015 CRF250R, and after completing a full print test on the bike it’ll go directly in to our 2015 250F motocross shootout. Be sure to keep an eye on dirtrider.com for full reviews on all of the new 2015 machines so that you can see what the Honda is up against.

Read more: http://www.dirtrider.com/features/2015-honda-crf250r-first-impression/#ixzz38YOvHb78

============








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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #22 : August 06, 2014, 10:02:30 a.m. »
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/auto/two-wheelers/honda-to-set-up-worlds-largest-scooter-plant-in-gujarat/articleshow/39570157.cms

Honda to set up world’s largest scooter plant in Gujarat

NEW DELHI: Honda Motors, which is swearing by scooters in India, is setting up the world's largest scooter plant in Gujarat to roll out 12 lakh units annually and achieve leadership position in the Indian two-wheeler market, especially with a growing number of customers shifting to this unisex multi-utility mode that has caught the fancy of many and outpaced almost every other segment.

Scooter sales have jumped by 29% in the ongoing fiscal, and now form 27% of the total two-wheeler market from just 8% a decade back. The ever-rising demand for scooters that has far outstripped supply has prompted Honda to set up its first dedicated scooter plant in Ahmedabad. "Even as we have more than doubled our scooter capacity in India, we have not been able to match up with the demand.

After 13 years of its launch, Activa continues to be on 'waiting' even as competition has multiplied ten times," said YS Guleria, Honda VP for marketing and sales in India. Honda had fired the imagination of scooter lovers with its Activa — launched way back in 2001.


"Even though we raised our production with three new scooters, demand still outstrips our estimates. While scooter production has trebled in the past decade, we still have a backlog of 60,000 scooters that should multiply in the festive months ahead," Guleria added. Honda would spend Rs 1,100 crore on the new plant in Ahmedabad, and expand its range with a few more offerings.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/39570157.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

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http://www.motorcycle-usa.com/923/18956/Motorcycle-Article/Honda-and-Trey-Canard-Sign-Deal-Through-2016.aspx

Honda and Trey Canard Sign Deal Through 2016

American Honda Motor Co., Inc. announced today that it will extend the contract with factory supercross and motocross rider Trey Canard for an additional two years. Canard has spent his entire professional career with the Honda brand, and this agreement continues that relationship, as the Oklahoma native will campaign a factory Honda CRF450R in the AMA Supercross Championship and AMA Pro Motocross Championship during the 2015 and 2016 seasons.

“I’m so excited to continue my long relationship with Honda for another two years,” Canard said. “The company, the team and everyone involved is really motivated about racing, and we’re all pushing hard and doing our best. I’ll continue to always give my best effort over these next two years, and we’re shooting for wins and championships. The enthusiasm around Honda right now is a really good thing that I’m excited to be a part of, and I think 2015 is going to be a great year
for us.”

After sitting out the entire 2014 AMA Supercross series while recovering from a broken arm, Canard has made a notable
comeback this summer in AMA Pro Motocross, regularly finishing on the podium. With three rounds remaining, he currently sits third in the points standings.

“We are very much looking forward to having Trey back with Honda for two more years,” said Ray Conway, Director of Racing at American Honda. “He has been with the company for his entire professional career, and he is a joy to work with. His performance this season, particularly in the Pro Motocross Championship, demonstrates his potential, and we’re expecting even better things from him in 2015 and ’16.”

Following a successful amateur career that culminated in his winning the 2007 AMA Horizon Award, Canard signed with the Factory Connection Honda team, earning the ’08 250SX Eastern Region crown in his rookie season aboard the CRF250R. Two years later, Canard added the AMA Pro Motocross 250 title to his résumé and rode for the winning USA team in the Motocross of Nations. For 2011, Canard moved up to a CRF450R with the factory Honda squad, where he has been ever since. Although hampered by injuries, Canard finished fifth in the 2011 AMA Supercross series and fourth in the 2013 AMA Pro Motocross series.

About American Honda
American Honda Motor Co., Inc. was established in 1959 and is the sole distributor of Honda motorcycles, scooters, ATVs and side-by-sides in the U.S. The American Honda Motorcycle Division is responsible for the sales, marketing, and operational activities for these products through authorized Honda dealers. For more information on Honda products, go to www.powersports.honda.com.

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #23 : ſeptembrie 18, 2014, 08:11:10 a.m. »
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/Doing-business-in-India-difficult-Honda-Motor-chief-says/articleshow/42385801.cms

Doing business in India difficult, Honda Motor chief says

NEW DELHI: The NarendraModi government may be talking of economic reforms, but the confidence of global investors in the Indian economy still seems jittery. Honda's global chairman Fumihiko Ike has said that doing business in India remains difficult and processes in the country are "complicated" and "burdensome".

Ike, who also heads the crucial Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA), said the new government should take steps to improve the investment in the country as poor infrastructure and uncertain tax regime makes it tough to do business in India.

Ike's statement comes a day after British telecom giant Vodafone echoed similar sentiments and European oil major BP also expressed "frustration" over the delay in gas price hike, which was delaying the proposed investment by the company. Vodafone, which battles a Rs 20,000 crore claim by the government over a capital gains tax issue, said foreign companies find it "difficult" to do business in India because of slower government clearances.

Speaking at the 54th annual convention of Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers ( Siam) here, Ike said the Indian government needs to take steps to make the country an attractive destination for foreign investors and "improve the business environment for investments".


READ ALSO: Honda plans to park in Sanand

Ike said component suppliers to automakers "encounter problems" in getting business permits and having their paperwork done and many of the processes related to the setting up of factories are "complicated" and thus require simplification.

Ike made a special mention of the tax regime in India which he said was "burdensome" when compared to other countries. This, he said, was "impeding investments" in India.

The Honda chief sought an early rollout of a single goods and services tax. "India has a complex domestic tax system. We want a single tax system."

However, while highlighting the problems being faced by foreign investors, Ike had a special mention for Prime Minister Narendra Modi who promised the ease of investments in India during his recent trip to Japan.

Ike said the Japanese investors were enthused by Modi's call to increase investments in India. "He has promised that red tape will be replaced by red carpet. This makes us optimistic on making investments."

BP Plc, whose $7.2 billion investment in 2011 was the largest foreign investment in the energy sector in India, said on Thursday that the delay in implementation of a natural gas price hike was frustrating.

"We are ready to go ahead with our first project which is probably a $4 billion project. We are getting ready to potentially move that forward (but) are waiting for the gas price decision. So, is that frustration, yes because it was decided last June 2013," said Sashi Mukundan, regional president and head of country (India), BP Group.

===========

http://www.powersportsbusiness.com/top-stories/2014/09/10/honda-recalls-126000-gl-1800-gl-1800a-motorcycles/

Honda recalls 126,000 GL 1800, GL 1800A motorcycles

American Honda Motor Co., Inc. has issued a recall on 126,000 motorcycles, though the OEM has yet to determine a remedy for the issue.

The recall affects 2001-10 and 2012 GL 1800 bikes, along with 2001-05 GL 1800A motorcycles. On those units, the rear brakes may drag after the brakes are released, increasing the risk of a crash. Extended riding with the rear brake dragging could also generate enough heat to result in a fire.

Honda is sending owners of the affected bikes an interim notification describing how to inspect their motorcycles for rear brake drake. A second notice will be sent once Honda has determined a remedy for the issue. Motorcycles that were already repaired under recall 11V-567 for rear brake drag will again be affected by this new recall and will again have to have their motorcycles fixed.


=============


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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #24 : Octombrie 07, 2014, 08:31:01 a.m. »

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #25 : Octombrie 14, 2014, 08:15:42 a.m. »


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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #27 : Noiembrie 26, 2014, 11:21:50 a.m. »
Honda a atins un hotar de producţie istoric: 300 de milioane de motociclete fabricate

http://www.automarket.ro/stiri/honda-a-atins-un-hotar-de-productie-istoric-300-de-milioane-de-motociclete-58963.html



Japonezii de la Honda au anunţat un nou hotar de producţie după ce au fabricat în total 300 de milioane de motocicluri la nivel global în cei 66 de ani de activitate.

60 de milioane din totalul de 300 de milioane de motociclete Honda fabricate vreodată sunt variante ale modelului Super Cub.

Honda sărbătoreşte producţia globală cumulată de 300 de milioane de motociclete. Constructorul nipon a început să fabrice în serie motocicluri în 1949, iar exemplarul cu numărul 300 milioane a părăsit astăzi linia de producţie a uzinei Kumamoto din Japonia, fabrica principală a diviziei moto a celor de la Honda. Modelul în cauză este un Goldwing ediţie aniversară, acesta din urmă sărbătorind 40 de ani de existenţă ai lui Goldwing. În prezent, Honda are 33 de fabrici de motociclete în 22 de ţări, dar expansiunea internaţională a siturilor de producţie a început în 1963, cu o fabrică deschisă în Belgia, până atunci fiind fabricate toate exemplarele doar la facilităţile din Japonia.





Le mulţumim clienţilor şi tuturor celor implicaţi în dezvoltarea, producţia şi vânzarea motocicletelor noastre. Vom livra în continuare produse care să fie pe placul clienţilor de pe toate pieţele pe care activăm.
Takanobu Ito
CEO Honda


Prima motocicletă de serie de la Honda a fost fabricată începând cu anul 1949 şi se numea Dream D. Însă cel mai popular model Honda este de departe Super Cub, ale cărui versiuni au reprezentat peste 60 de milioane de unităţi din cele 300 de milioane fabricate de producătorul nipon în istoria sa. Modelul Super Cub a fost introdus în fabricaţie în anul 1958 şi încă este fabricat şi vândut pe anumite pieţe, conform filozofiei Honda de a produce cât mai aproape de consumator. Honda Super Cub a lansat o adevărată modă în lumea moto prin simplitatea sa, categoria din care face parte acesta fiind denumită „underbone”. Spre deosebire de un scuter, motociclurile de tip „underbone” au roţi mai mari şi folosesc „scăriţe” pentru sprijinul picioarelor în loc de o podea. Această categorie este echivalentul moto al caroseriei monococă autoportante.



Honda Super Cub este şi modelul care a făcut istorie pentru marca japoneză în materie de marketing, spotul original creat de Grey Advertising pentru Super Cub în SUA fiind considerat primul care a prezentat ideea de "lifestyle marketing". Campania "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" (n.r. "Cunoşti cei mai amabili oameni cu o Honda") a durat 12 ani şi vroia să popularizeze o altă imagine a motocicliştilor în SUA şi să facă acest mijloc de transport atractiv pentru mai multe clase sociale.

Reclamă clasică Honda parte a campaniei "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" = http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysmG_NfQVb0#t=22

Via Greencarcongress | Honda | Motorcyclist

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Re: Stiri HONDA MOTO !
« Răspuns #28 : Noiembrie 29, 2014, 08:36:01 a.m. »
After lucky number 300,000,000, Honda Gold Wing GL1800 India launch

Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India has launched the touring Honda Gold Wing motorcycle today. The aerodynamically refined Honda Gold Wing gets power from a six-cylinder 1832cc engine.




Read more at http://www.rushlane.com/honda-gold-wing-gl1800-india-rs-28-50-lakhs-12137742.html#2FO6rkRbvGYuDVSu.99

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